With Holi just a week away, there is no better place to welcome the onset of spring than by the Arabian Sea. Celebrated to mark the victory of good over evil, as per Hindu mythology, Holi festivities range from the rather elaborate North Indian traditions, to the mellower religion centric South Indian ones.

Holi in Goa is celebrated on different days in different regions and forms a part of the week-long festivities of the world-famous Shigmo Festival. In some of its villages, the night prior to Holi (full moon night) is known as ‘Choti Holi’ (‘Choti’ is Hindi for ‘Small’) and is celebrated by lighting a big bonfire made up of dried leaves, twigs, wood and is surrounded by people singing, dancing and rejoicing the termination of evil – ‘Holika’ (Hindu mythological character).

Choti Holi is followed by ‘Badi Holi’ (‘Badi’ is Hindi for ‘Big’), during which people of all age groups come out in the open (parking lots, streets, parks, etc.) and dance, sing, play with dry dyes, coloured water, water balloons and even fill up gun shaped syringes with water commonly called ‘pichkaris’ and use it to spray water on passersby – Language, caste and creed hold no barriers here.

Each colour has significance and conveys a strong message, for instance ‘Yellow’ is not only considered auspicious and associated with Mother Earth, but portrays optimism as well. ‘Red’ symbolizes fire, the driving force or the source of energy and security. ‘Green’ represents prosperity, compassion and inference. The famous ‘Gulal’ which is generally pink in colour, conveys the message of love and compassion, while Blue stands for trust and loyalty.

Holi represents the end of a period of darkness and winters according to another story in Hindu mythology and is also said to mark the death of Pootna – the devil who nearly killed Lord Krishna as a child. It is celebrated with great amount of fervor and zest by people from every Goan society. The energy levels are sky-high during the morning which recedes by the afternoon when everyone gets exhausted and the music is reduced to a lower key as well. The day ends by exchanging greetings in the evening with neighbours and family members.

Besides the colour game, this is the apt time to indulge in some delicious Goan delicacies, like sweets and fish, and quench your thirst with the first distillation of fenny which is only available at this time of the year, locally called Uraak.

*WE ARE OFFERING SPECIAL WATER SPORTS & EXCURSION PACKAGES AND DISCOUNTS FOR HOLI SO FEEL FREE TO CONTACT US ONLINE THROUGH OUR SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS AND WEBSITE OR ALTERNATIVELY YOU COULD CALL/EMAIL US AS WELL.*

About Author

client-photo-1
Jeffrey Cray
A part time blogger and full time web-marketeer. From Goa, India. Has roots in Jerusalem, Israel and Pattaya Thailand. A nature freak and travel junkie. Currently operates out of Thailand."